Resources / Blogs in my RSS Reader

10925476_10153078320512118_5811918647681445635_oWhen I spoke at the PRSSA Regional Conference “PR Elevated” hosted by Utah Valley University earlier this week, I was asked what some of the news sources, blogs and other resources I am tapped into to stay relevant. Because I subscribe to so many (via my RSS reader), I promised to review the list and post my top recommendations. The ones I am listing here are ones I read but also ones that I would recommend for young PR professionals. (There are others that cover higher level issues that you may find “over your head” and are not included here.)

Obviously, you can’t possibly go to all these sites every day (or even every week) so that’s where the RSS Reader comes in. I use Inoreader but there are others available. In addition to these industry-related blogs, I also check headlines from local/regional newspapers (online) USA Today and Gawker and tune the TV into CNN Headline News (HLN) in the morning while I’m getting ready. HLN’s Morning Express with Robin Meade program essentially repeats the headlines every 30 minutes so no matter when you tune in, within 30 minutes you’re in the know! In this business, that’s a must. If you have questions, suggestions, feedback, please comment or contact me. Hope this helps!

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Being the Hybrid PR Professional

New Pros Panel. Photo by Tressa Robbins.

New Pros Panel at PRSAICon. Photo by Tressa Robbins.

The most successful public relations campaigns are cohesive, tackling traditional PR and digital and social marketing and advertising to reach targeted audience. At a session at this year’s PRSA International Conference, three relatively new pros spoke about being the hybrid PR professional and spreading campaigns across multiple platforms.

Lauren Gray, Jonathan “JR” Rochester and Jess Noonan—all former national PRSSA officers, now members of the New Professionals PRSA section, discussed how today’s PR pro must be a hybrid and understand not only the the strengths and weaknesses of each platform, but when it’s appropriate to use which one. They talked about how the new PR pro’s skills must go beyond traditional PR and media relations to address the demand for integrated campaigns. NOTE: See my last post on the Clorox campaign as a great example of an integrated campaign.

PR, by definition, has changed in the past 30 years, as have the skills required to do the job. This “dream team” of young professionals talked about flexibility and handling change (seemingly effortlessly) as being critical characteristics of the new PR professional. They quoted Deirdre Breakenridge, an experienced public relations professional and author of several books on the intersection of technology and public relations, who said, “Public Relations is becoming more integrated with marketing and advertising. It’s important to embrace new technology to do justice to the brand. All areas should be working together.”

To further prove the point, they showed a recent job description (see image below)—pointing out that it’s not just writing press releases and pitching stories to the media, but the qualified job candidate will also need to have a basic understanding of business strategy, be able to perform thorough research and create proposals, have strong writing skills for content creation, ethical common sense, social media acumen, as well as being able to track key metrics and provide measurement tie-backs to KPIs.HybridPRslide

It seemed to me that the one constant is that things are constantly changing in this industry, and we are its perpetual students.

This post by Tressa Robbins originally appeared on October 29, 2014, on the BurrellesLuce Fresh Ideas blog at http://www.burrellesluce.com/freshideas/2014/10/being-the-hybrid-pr-professional and is cross-posted here with permission.

Networking: Keeping Contacts as a New Professional

Source: flickr.com/photos/dellphotos. CC BY 2.0

You studied hard, joined PRSSA, did multiple internships, networked, graduated, networked some more and got a job. Phew! Now, you no longer have to worry about your LinkedIn activity, participate in that Twitter chat or attend local industry events, right? Wrong!

In case you haven’t already figured it out, the PR industry is like a big small-town. There aren’t six degrees of separation, in many cases there are barely three. It seems everyone knows everyone (or knows someone who knows someone). This tight-knittedness is capable of swinging the pendulum in your favor–or not. The choice, really, is yours.

How do you hold on to that network you’ve worked so hard to build? How do you continue to build that network, and make it work for you?

  1.  My first suggestion is to not just attend your PRSA chapter meetings, but volunteer and get involved. As current president of the PRSA-St. Louis Chapter, I can tell you that having new pros on our committees are just as important as having senior pros. You provide a different perspective, and we need allviewpoints represented. In addition, You will work side-by-side with seasoned pros, who will get to know your solid work ethic first-hand and meet people you may have not have had access to otherwise. Volunteering is work, and creates work experience.
  2.  Participate in Twitter chats. Not just #NPPRSA, but other industry-related chats, such as #PRprochat started by Carrie Morgan, or the #SoloPR chat spearheaded by Kellye Crane. Not only may you meet your next recruit, but many senior pros participate in those chats as well. Doing this keeps you in front of your network, expands your network, and may even provide informational content you can later expand into a blog post!
  3.  Join applicable LinkedIn groups and participate in the discussions. Don’t feel like you can’t contribute if you don’t know the answers–ask questions, there may be others with the same question.
  4.  I’m sure you have certain industry-leading blogs to which you subscribe. Don’t just read those posts, comment and reply to other comments. Add value to the community. Warning: be careful to not over-do it; you don’t want to comes across as a stalker.
  5. Finally, swinging back to #1 – involvement in your local PR organization. You should at least set a goal of attending one event per quarter (4 per year).  And, don’t just attend make a point of introducing yourself to at least three new people at each event. Then, within a couple days of the event, connect with them on LinkedIn—reminding them where you met and thanking them for the conversation, then follow-up. The follow-up doesn’t have to be often but does need to be pertinent and professional.

A case in point: a while back I wrote a post on mentoring for BurrellesLuce Fresh Ideas blog. In it, I mentioned that Lori George Billingsley, director of issues communications at The Coca-Cola Company and past PRSA Multicultural Communications Section chair, claims her mentor has been instrumental in helping her secure all of the PR jobs she’s held.  That’s a pretty powerful testament to her networking, diligence and professionalism!

There’s no doubt that social media makes it much easier to keep in touch with people. However, no matter how much you keep in touch electronically, nothing beats face-to-face conversations to build your network!

*This post by Tressa Robbins originally appeared on PRNewPros Blog at http://prnewpros.prsa.org/?p=1738, and was subsequently posted on BurrellesLuce Fresh Ideas blog at http://www.burrellesluce.com/freshideas/2014/02/networking-keeping-contacts-as-a-new-professional and is cross-posted here with permission.